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Latest News

12

December 2017

Midlife muscle maintenance: the nutritional secret to building muscle in your 40s and beyond

By: Epoch

SOURCE: Telegraph

 


We see it all the time. The busiest place in the gym is the mirror next to the weights – plenty of flexing, a few selfies and a protein shake thrown in for good measure.

Don’t worry, I'm not about to tell you that you need to go down that route – although you do need to start paying attention to your muscles. In a sense, your muscles are the forgotten man of mainstream health coverage: the media tends to obsess over body fat, looking lean, and reducing overall weight. However, our muscles are key to keeping us moving freely throughout our busy lives. We neglect them at our peril.

In recent years, there has been increasing research on the muscle, and how protein supports growth and repair, both for athletes in their prime and non-athletes at different stages of life. As with all the performance nutrition principles I'm discussing in this column, to get the most from your body relies on exercise and nutrition working together. Exercise is king and nutrition is queen. This is one relationship to invest time in.

Our muscles are key to keeping us moving freely throughout our busy lives. We neglect them at our peril.James Collins

Like an aging car, the body becomes less efficient as we move through our thirties. A key part of this physiological decline is the loss of muscle mass and function – a process known as sarcopenia. You may feel fine now, but this gradual decline in muscle strength and mass can result in the reduced ability to perform your favourite activities as you get older (playing golf, going on a weekend run, or even just walking around town). That’s why fighting the aging process, using exercise and nutrition, should start as soon as possible.

The NHS's physical activity guidelines for adults aged 19-64 was recently updated to include (at least) two resistance training sessions a week, where all the major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms) are worked.

But training on its own isn’t enough. The second key component of muscle growth (also called muscle protein synthesis), is eating enough protein. Foods containing protein are digested, broken down into small building blocks known as 'amino acids' and these blocks are then used by the muscle to repair and build new tissue.

Your muscles undergo constant change over 24 hours, breaking down and rebuilding, so your daily protein intake needs to be sufficient to meet this demand and maintain your overall muscle mass.

What are the best foods to maintain your muscles? Well, ‘complete’ proteins, typically from animal sources, containing a complete range of amino acids, have been shown to be most beneficial, such as dairy, poultry and fish. Quinoa and buckwheat also fall into the 'complete' category. Other plant sources are also good, but miss one or more amino acids to make them complete – this means they need to be combined with other plant proteins (e.g. rice and beans), which is easy at mealtimes.

This combination of resistance training and sufficient protein are the same principles elite athletes follow to keep their muscles strong and powerful – although with aging, the muscles become less responsive (set in their ways) to both training and protein. This means protein intakes need to increase towards old age.

In general, doing some resistance work and getting enough protein to offset it shouldn’t feel like a life overall. You don’t need to start shifting those massive atlas balls like on World’s Strongest Man, but there does need to be some intent into your maintaining your muscles. Here’s how to get started...

Three steps to maintaining your muscles

1. Don’t resist resistance

Government recommendations are for 2 resistance sessions a weekwhich activate the six major muscle groups: legs, abdominals, back, chest, shoulders and arms. Book a session with a personal trainer to take you through the exercises and build confidence.

2. Prioritise protein

Include a serving of protein with each meal. This keeps a regular supply to the muscles. Include a portion of lean meat (fish, poultry) on your plate, or extra nuts, seeds or beans.

3. Reinvent breakfast

This is often where the protein can be low. To meet your needs, really you should have more than tea and toast in the morning. Eggs, porridge or cereals (with milk) are all good options. If you are in a hurry, even adding a glass of milk or Greek yoghurt to your existing breakfast can help to make the meal more functional.

 

 

READ MORE

12

December 2017

Midlife muscle maintenance: the nutritional secret to building muscle in your 40s and beyond

By: Epoch

SOURCE: Telegraph

 


We see it all the time. The busiest place in the gym is the mirror next to the weights – plenty of flexing, a few selfies and a protein shake thrown in for good measure.

Don’t worry, I'm not about to tell you that you need to go down that route – although you do need to start paying attention to your muscles. In a sense, your muscles are the forgotten man of mainstream health coverage: the media tends to obsess over body fat, looking lean, and reducing overall weight. However, our muscles are key to keeping us moving freely throughout our busy lives. We neglect them at our peril.

In recent years, there has been increasing research on the muscle, and how protein supports growth and repair, both for athletes in their prime and non-athletes at different stages of life. As with all the performance nutrition principles I'm discussing in this column, to get the most from your body relies on exercise and nutrition working together. Exercise is king and nutrition is queen. This is one relationship to invest time in.

Our muscles are key to keeping us moving freely throughout our busy lives. We neglect them at our peril.James Collins

Like an aging car, the body becomes less efficient as we move through our thirties. A key part of this physiological decline is the loss of muscle mass and function – a process known as sarcopenia. You may feel fine now, but this gradual decline in muscle strength and mass can result in the reduced ability to perform your favourite activities as you get older (playing golf, going on a weekend run, or even just walking around town). That’s why fighting the aging process, using exercise and nutrition, should start as soon as possible.

The NHS's physical activity guidelines for adults aged 19-64 was recently updated to include (at least) two resistance training sessions a week, where all the major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms) are worked.

But training on its own isn’t enough. The second key component of muscle growth (also called muscle protein synthesis), is eating enough protein. Foods containing protein are digested, broken down into small building blocks known as 'amino acids' and these blocks are then used by the muscle to repair and build new tissue.

Your muscles undergo constant change over 24 hours, breaking down and rebuilding, so your daily protein intake needs to be sufficient to meet this demand and maintain your overall muscle mass.

What are the best foods to maintain your muscles? Well, ‘complete’ proteins, typically from animal sources, containing a complete range of amino acids, have been shown to be most beneficial, such as dairy, poultry and fish. Quinoa and buckwheat also fall into the 'complete' category. Other plant sources are also good, but miss one or more amino acids to make them complete – this means they need to be combined with other plant proteins (e.g. rice and beans), which is easy at mealtimes.

This combination of resistance training and sufficient protein are the same principles elite athletes follow to keep their muscles strong and powerful – although with aging, the muscles become less responsive (set in their ways) to both training and protein. This means protein intakes need to increase towards old age.

In general, doing some resistance work and getting enough protein to offset it shouldn’t feel like a life overall. You don’t need to start shifting those massive atlas balls like on World’s Strongest Man, but there does need to be some intent into your maintaining your muscles. Here’s how to get started...

Three steps to maintaining your muscles

1. Don’t resist resistance

Government recommendations are for 2 resistance sessions a weekwhich activate the six major muscle groups: legs, abdominals, back, chest, shoulders and arms. Book a session with a personal trainer to take you through the exercises and build confidence.

2. Prioritise protein

Include a serving of protein with each meal. This keeps a regular supply to the muscles. Include a portion of lean meat (fish, poultry) on your plate, or extra nuts, seeds or beans.

3. Reinvent breakfast

This is often where the protein can be low. To meet your needs, really you should have more than tea and toast in the morning. Eggs, porridge or cereals (with milk) are all good options. If you are in a hurry, even adding a glass of milk or Greek yoghurt to your existing breakfast can help to make the meal more functional.

 

 

READ MORE

7

November 2017

9 signs of Low T

By: Epoch

SOURCE: HealthLine.com


 

Testosterone is a hormone produced by the human body. It’s mainly produced in men by the testicles. Testosterone affects a man’s appearance and sexual development. It stimulates sperm production as well as a man’s sex drive. It also helps build muscle and bone mass.

Testosterone production typically decreases with age. According to the American Urological Association, about 2 out of 10 men older than 60 years have low testosterone. That increases slightly to 3 out of 10 men in their 70s and 80s.

Men can experience a range of symptoms if testosterone decreases more than it should. Low testosterone, or low T, is diagnosed when levels fall below 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL). A normal range is typically 300–1000 ng/dL, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. A blood test called a serum testosterone test is used to determine your level of circulating testosterone.

A range of symptoms can occur if testosterone production drastically drops below normal. Signs of low T are often subtle. Keep reading to learn the signs of low T in men.

LOW SEX DRIVE

Testosterone plays a key role in libido (sex drive) in men. Some men may experience a decline in sex drive as they age. However, someone with low T will likely experience a more drastic drop in their desire to have sex.

DIFFICULTY WITH ERECTION

While testosterone stimulates a man’s sex drive, it also aids in achieving and maintaining an erection. Testosterone alone doesn’t cause an erection, but it stimulates receptors in the brain to produce nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is a molecule that helps trigger a series of chemical reactions necessary for an erection to occur. When testosterone levels are too low, a man may have difficulty achieving an erection prior to sex or having spontaneous erections (for example, during sleep).

However, testosterone is only one of many factors that aid in adequate erections. Research is inconclusive regarding the role of testosterone replacement in the treatment of erectile dysfunction. In a review of studies that looked at the benefit of testosterone in men with erection difficulties, nearly halfshowed no improvement with testosterone treatment. Many times, other health problems play a role in erectile difficulties. 

LOW SEMEN VOLUME

Testosterone plays a role in the production of semen, which is the milky fluid that aids in the motility of sperm. Men with low T will often notice a decrease in the volume of their semen during ejaculation.

HAIR LOSS

Testosterone plays a role in several body functions, including hair production. Balding is a natural part of aging for many men. While there is an inherited component to balding, men with low T may experience a loss of body and facial hair, as well.

FATIGUE

Men with low T have reported extreme fatigue and decrease in energy levels. You might have low T if you are tired all of the time despite getting plenty of sleep or if you’re finding it harder to get motivated to exercise.

LOSS OF MUSCLE MASS

Because testosterone plays a role in building muscle, men with low T might notice a decrease in muscle mass. Studies have shown testosterone affects muscle mass, but not necessarily strength or function.

INCREASED BODY FAT

Men with low T may also experience increases in body fat. In particular, they sometimes develop gynecomastia, or enlarged breast tissue. This effect is believed to occur due to an imbalance between testosterone and estrogen within men.

DECREASED BONE MASS

Osteoporosis, or the thinning of bone mass, is a condition often associated with women. However, men with low T can also experience bone loss. Testosterone helps produce and strengthen bone. So men with low T, especially older men, have lower bone volume and are more susceptible to bone fractures.

MOOD CHANGE

Men with low T can experience changes in mood. Because testosterone influences many physical processes in the body, it can also influence mood and mental capacity. Research suggests that men with low T are more likely to face depression, irritability, or a lack of focus.

If you feel that you are suffering from some of these symptoms. Contact Epoch Men's Health today for a screening. We are the experts when it comes to Low Testosterone. 




READ MORE

27

September 2017

10 Ways For Men to Prevent Cancer Today

By: Epoch

Source: TIME



Sweat Daily

In a University of Vermont study, the fittest men were 68 percent less likely to develop lung cancer and 38 percent less likely to develop colorectal cancers than the least active men—and those who developed cancer had better outcomes if they exercised regularly. Cardio and resistance training help control inflammation and hormone levels—and they keep your immune system strong to fend off wayward cells. (Turn up your muscle gains outside the gym. These 18 Ways to Build Muscle All Day will help you shed fat, sculpt muscle, and accelerate recovery.)

Skip Anything Fried

Guys who eat french fries, fried chicken, fried fish, or fried doughnuts once or more a week have up to a 37 percent higher risk of prostate cancer, according to a new study from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Oil that’s heated to high temperatures develops carcinogenic compounds in food. (You might not know you're missing vital nutrients, but here's how to get them by learning these 6 New Food Rules to Follow.)

Sip Pomegranate Juice

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison found that pomegranate juice may stunt lung cancer growth. Plus, previous studies also show it delays prostate cancer in mice and stabilizes PSA levels in men who’ve been treated for the cancer. Sip about 16 ounces of the juice per day, which is rich in polyphenols, isoflavones, and ellagic acid that may team up to fight cancer.

Get Screened

If there’s a screening for a type of cancer and you’re eligible for it, get it. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that if everyone over 50 had regular colon cancer screenings, 60 percent of deaths from the disease could be prevented. Talk to your doctor about screenings for colorectal, prostate, testicular, skin, and lung cancer. (Discover 8 stealth strategies to Cancer-Proof Your Body.)

Snack on Blueberries

The fruit is brimming with a compound called pterostilbene that may slash precancerous lesions in the gut that, left unchecked, could lead to colon cancer, Rutgers University researchers say. Aim for a cup and a half of blueberries per day—pour them over your cereal, snack on them fresh, or dump them into a daily smoothie.

Befriend Fiber

People on a high-fiber eating plan—about 17 grams per 1,000 calories—had a 19 percent decrease in kidney cancer risk compared with those who took in the least, a study in the journal Clinical Nutrition found. Fiber may block cancer-causing toxins from traveling from your intestines to your kidneys, the study reports. (Here are more foods with amazing—and scientifically proven—health benefits: Check out the 50 Foods with Superpowers.)

Get Help to Stop Snoring

People with severe sleep apnea—snoring is the main symptom—are almost five times as likely to die of cancer as those who snooze more soundly, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. With sleep apnea, levels of oxygen in your blood dip. This can cause small existing tumors to grow new blood vessels, giving them fuel to develop faster and spread through your bloodstream more quickly.

Stand Up

More than 92,000 cases of cancer a year can be blamed on sitting too much, a study by the American Institute for Cancer Research suggests. Even if you exercise regularly, you’re still at risk. Set your cell phone alarm to remind you to stand for one to two minutes every hour. It’ll help reduce levels of molecules in your body that are linked with cancer risk.

Down the Sunshine Vitamin

People who supplemented their diets with 1,000 IU of vitamin D every day decreased their risk of cancer by as much as 77 percent over four years compared to those who popped a placebo, reports a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Vitamin D is also available in salmon, sardines, and shiitake mushrooms.

Go Nuts

Eat three Brazil nuts every day, which deliver healthy selenium. A Harvard study found that this amount is associated with a 48 percent lower incidence of advanced prostate cancer.


 

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Movember Facial Contest

Epoch Men's Health is dedicated to helping saving the lives of men across the country! Show us your facial hair for the month of November and you can win a Yeti prize pack.

Learn More